10 FACTS ABOUT WORLD HUNGER

  1. 1.3% of the world’s population is hungry. That’s roughly 805 million people who go undernourished on a daily     basis, consuming less than the recommended 2,100 calories a day.
     

  2. In 2018, 4.4% or over 14.3 million American households were food insecure with limited or uncertain access to enough food.
     

  3. Households with children are more likely to experience food insecurity. Before the coronavirus pandemic, more than 10 million children live in food-insecure households.
     

  4. Due to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, more than 54 million people in the US may experience food insecurity in 2020, including a potential 18 million children.
     

  5. Every community in the country is home to families who struggle with food insecurity including rural and suburban communities.
     

  6. The world produces enough food to feed all 7 billion people, but those who go hungry either do not have land to grow food or money to purchase it. Fight hunger in your community by collecting food outside a local supermarket.
     

  7. 10 countries that have achieved greatest success in reducing the total number of hungry people in proportion to their national population are Armenia, Azerbaijan, Brazil, Cuba, Georgia, Ghana, Kuwait, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Thailand and Venezuela.
     

  8. Poverty is the principal cause of hunger. The causes of poverty include poor people's lack of resources, an extremely unequal income distribution in the world and within specific countries, conflict, and hunger itself.
     

  9. In 2010, an estimated 7.6 million children — more than 20,000 a day — died. Poor nutrition plays a role in at least half of these deaths. 
     

  10. Nearly 98% of worldwide hunger exists in underdeveloped countries. 

 

 

 

 

Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014." FAO, 2014. Web Accessed May 1, 2015. 

Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World. Part 3: Feeding the World." FAO, 2012. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014." FAO, 2014. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

World Bank. "Overview: Understanding, measuring, overcoming poverty." World Bank, 2010. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

UNICEF. "The State of the World's Children 2008: Women and Children - Child Survival." UNICEF, 2008. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014." FAO, 2014. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

UNICEF. "The State of the World's Children 2008: Women and Children - Child Survival." UNICEF, 2008. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014." FAO, 2014. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014." FAO, 2014. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

Black, Robert E, Lindsay H Allen, Zulfiqar A Bhutta, Laura E Caulfield, Mercedes de Onis, Majid Ezzati, Colin Mathers, Juan Rivera. "Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences." The Lancet, 2008. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

Black, Robert E, Lindsay H Allen, Zulfiqar A Bhutta, Laura E Caulfield, Mercedes de Onis, Majid Ezzati, Colin Mathers, Juan Rivera. "Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences." The Lancet, 2008. Web Accessed May 1, 2015.  

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